FOSSASIA 2016 talk: Virtualization and Containers

I did a talk earlier today at the wonderful venue of the Science Centre Singapore at FOSSASIA 2016, titled ‘Virtualization and Containers.’ Over the last few years, several “cool new” and “next big thing” technologies have been introduced to the world, and these buzzwords leave people all dazed and confused.

One of my aims for this talk was to introduce people to the concepts behind virtualization and containers, explain that these aren’t really new technologies, and why there’s so much interest in them of late.

I also think there’s a lot of misinformation spread around these topics, so this was also an attempt to set some facts straight.

The slides are here, and I will post an update with the link to the video.

FOSDEM 2016 Talk: Live Migration of Virtual Machines From The Bottom Up

I just did a talk titled ‘Live Migration of Virtual Machines From The Bottom Up‘ at the FOSDEM conference in Brussels, Belgium.  The slides are available at this location.

The talk introduced the KVM stack (Linux, KVM, QEMU, libvirt) and live migration; introduced ways the higher layers (especially oVirt and OpenStack) use KVM and migration, and what challenges the KVM team faces in working with varying use-cases and new features added to make migration work, and work faster.

There was a video recording, I will post the link to it in a separate post.

Update: video recording available at this location.

SCaLE14x Talk: KVM Weather Report

I did a talk titled ‘KVM Weather Report‘ at the SCaLE conference in Pasadena, California yesterday.  The slides are available at this location.

The talk introduced the KVM stack (Linux, KVM, QEMU, libvirt); briefly went over some features and the communities around the projects, and discussed some of the new features added to the KVM stack in the last year.

Next up is my talk on live migration of VMs at FOSDEM in Belgium.

Live Migrating QEMU-KVM Virtual Machines: Full Text

I’ve attempted to write down all I said while delivering my devconf.cz talk on Live Migrating QEMU-KVM Virtual Machines.  The full text is on the Red Hat Developer Blog:

http://developerblog.redhat.com/2015/03/24/live-migrating-qemu-kvm-virtual-machines/

My talk at the CentOS Dojo Pune 2014

I spoke at the CentOS Dojo in Pune yesterday on new features available in CentOS release 7.0 since the 6 release.  Slides are available here: What’s New in Virtualization.  The event was organized by the Pune GNU/Linux Users Group (PLUG) for the CentOS project.

Continue reading “My talk at the CentOS Dojo Pune 2014”

Session notes from the Virtualization microconf at the 2012 LPC

The Linux Plumbers Conf wiki seems to have made the discussion notes for the 2012 conf read-only as well as visible only to people who have logged in.  I suspect this is due to the spam problem, but I’ll put those notes here so that they’re available without needing a login.  The source is here.

These are the notes I took during the virtualization microconference at the 2012 Linux Plumbers Conference.

Continue reading “Session notes from the Virtualization microconf at the 2012 LPC”

FUDCon Pune: My talk on ‘Linux Virtualization’

My second talk at FUDCon Pune was on Virtualization (slides) on day 2.  While I had registered the talk well in advance, I wasn’t quite sure what really to talk about: should I talk about the basics of virtualization?  Should I talk about what’s latest (coming up in Fedora 16)?  Should I talk about how KVM works in detail?  My first talk on git had gone well, and as expected for this FUDCon, majority of the participants were students.  Expecting a similar student-heavy audience for the 2nd talk as well, I decided on discussing the basics of the Linux Virt Stack.  Kashyap had a session lined up after me on libvirt, so I thought I could give an overview of virt-manager, libvirt, QEMU and Linux (KVM).

And since my registered talk title was ‘Latest in Linux Virtualization’, I did leave a few slides on upcoming enhancements in Fedora 16 (mostly concentrating on the QEMU side of things) at the end of the slide deck, to cover those things if I had time left.

As with the previous git talk, I didn’t get around to making the slides and deciding on the flow of the talk till the night before the day of the talk, and that left me with much less sleep than normal.  The video for the talk is available online; I haven’t seen it myself, but if you do, you’ll find I was almost sleep-talking through the session.

To make it interactive as well as keep me awake, I asked the audience to stop me and ask questions any time during the talk.  What was funny about that was the talk was also being live streamed, and the audio signal for the live streaming was carried via one mic and the audio stream for the audience as well as the recorded talk was on a different mic.  So even though the audience questions were taken on the audience mic, I had to repeat the questions for the people who were catching the talk live.

I got some feedback later from a few people — I missed to introduce myself, and I should have put some performance graphs in the slides, as almost all users would be interested in KVM performance vs other hypervisors.  Both good points.  The performance slides I hadn’t thought about earlier, I’ll try to incorporate some such graphs in future presentations.  Interestingly, I hadn’t also thought of introducing myself.  Previously, I was used to someone else introducing me and then me picking up from there.  At the FUDCon, we (the organisers) missed on getting speaker bios, and didn’t have volunteers introduce each speaker before their sessions.  So no matter which way I look at it, I take the blame as speaker and organiser for not having done this.

There was some time before my session to start and there were a few people in the auditorium (the room where the talk was to be held), so Kashyap thought of playing some Fedora / FOSS / Red Hat videos.  (People generally like the Truth Happens video, and that one was played as well.)  These, and many more are available on the Red Hat Videos channel on YouTube. There was also some time between my session and Kashyap’s (to allow for people to move around, take a break, etc.), so we played the F16 release video that Jared gave us.

Overall, I think the talk went quite well (though I may have just dreamed that).  I tried to stay awake for Kashyap’s session on libvirt to answer any questions directed my way; I know I did answer a couple of them, so I must have managed to stay up.

FUDCon Pune: My session on ‘Learning Git’

My session on learning git (slides) was scheduled right after the lunch break on the first day of the FUDCon Pune 2011.

I had targeted the session for beginners; however I had some help from Shakthi, who conducted a session on git during the 2nd FAD and from Ramky who spoke on version control systems in the talk before mine.  So I could skip a few basic things and get right on to the demo.

I didn’t really get the luxury to prepare in advance; I had in my mind what I would do in general, but got the slides and the flow ready just the night prior to the talk.  Organising FUDCon wasn’t too taxing, but there are a few last-minute things that have to be done, well, at the last minute.  And the presentation, etc., had to wait.

I have earlier seen students just attend sessions but not really follow up on what they were being taught.  So I thought I’d make this an interactive session, inviting people from the audience to participate in the session by someone coming up on the stage and writing a .c program, someone else coming up and creating a git repo, then someone else modifying the code, doing another commit, and so on.

While I thought about this, I recalled Rusty’s session at foss.in a few years back where he did such a thing successfully.  Now emulating that feat would be really difficult.  People who have attended Rusty’s talks would know what I mean.  He puts in hours and days for such talks.  I’m sure he’d have thought about how to pull it off even if the person to come up on stage wouldn’t know how to type.

There were about 50 – 60 people attending the  talk.  So what I did, instead, was to ask the attendees about who knew how to write C programs, and who knew how to type fast.  I called up one such attendee and asked him to write a simple ‘Hello, World!’ program.

I then called up someone else (Aditya) to commit the first version.  Thankfully, the original C file did not have any punctuation in the ‘Hello, World!’ string, so the idea for the 2nd commit was ready.  Once Aditya initialised the git repo and did the first commit, I modified the program output to add the comma and exclamation point and make that the 2nd commit in the git repo.  I then moved on to create a new C program that prints out ‘Goodbye, World’ (we had dedicated the conference to Dennis Ritchie).  This was done in a new branch called ‘goodbye’.  Next was to create another branch, called ‘fudcon’, and write another C program to show ‘Hello, FUDCon’.  Then a few lessons on merging, switching branches, viewing commits and logs from other branches followed.  The slides have the list of commands that were shown.

The last step was to clone this repo into another local one, commit a few things there, do a push into the original repo, make some other pulls here and there, and the session participants were ready with hands-on git lessons that they could use.

I had quite a few questions during and after the session, and I even heard of people trying out the examples after the talk. So I’d call the talk/demo a success.